Vehicle Inspection

Relating to vehicle safety inspection.

What if my vehicle failed the OBD check?

If your vehicle failed, it must be repaired in order to receive a new inspection sticker. Your vehicle should be repaired by a qualified, trained automotive service technician equipped with the appropriate diagnostic and repair tools. Depending on your vehicle’s age and mileage, repairs may be covered by the vehicle manufacturer’s warranty. Refer to your vehicle owner’s manual for specific information on warranty coverage.

Following are possible reasons for failing the OBD check:

What does the OBD check involve?

First, the vehicle is checked to see if the Malfunction Indicator Light (commonly called the "check engine" or "service engine soon" light) on the instrument panel illuminates when the ignition key is turned to the "on" position and then when the engine is running. Next, an electronic device known as a scan tool is connected to the vehicle, and used to communicate with the vehicle’s on board computer.

What equipment is needed to inspect OBD Systems?

A scan tool with generic OBD II capability is necessary to perform the required check. A scan tool is a very useful device which is commonly used to assist in the diagnosis and repair of a variety of vehicle problems. Many inspection stations already own scan tools which can also be used to perform the required OBD check, but those inspection stations which do not will need to have one in order to inspect 1996 and newer vehicles. At a minimum, scan tools must be capable of :

What is OBD and how does it work?

OBD technology was developed in the 1980s by vehicle manufacturers to help technicians diagnose and service the computerized engine management systems of modern vehicles. A new generation of OBD (often referred to as OBD II) is present on 1996 and newer vehicles. All 1996 and newer vehicles now monitor the same components, use the same type of connector, use the same computer "language" and the same criteria for evaluating the powertrain systems and indicating problems to the driver and the repair technician.

Automated Vehicle Inspection Program (AVIP)

AVIP integrates electronic data collection and management into Vermont's Safety and Emissions Inspection process. This is a major effort to improve program effectiveness and efficiency.

Automated Vehicle Inspection Program (AVIP)

What Changed with the New AVIP?

Official Inspection Stations and Inspection Mechanics now use a ruggedized tablet computer to guide them through the safety and emissions inspection. The new AVIP uses a wireless Onboard Diagnostic (OBDII) scan tool during emissions inspections to access and record the vehicle's OBDII data and a wireless printer.

Vermont's inspection criteria remains the same for each type of vehicle requiring inspection.

Inspection Station Tablet

Ruggedized tablet and customized software

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Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles
120 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05603-0001

Monday-Friday: 7:45am-4:30pm
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