Vehicle Inspection

Relating to vehicle safety inspection.

Time Extension Waiver

The state of Vermont recognizes that emissions repairs not covered under warranty can be costly. There is a time extension waiver available to allow for additional time to bring your vehicle into compliance.

My vehicle did not pass inspection. What next?

If your vehicle failed a safety component, speak to your repair technician and have it repaired immediately. You must pass the safety portion of the vehicle inspection in order to receive a pass sticker.

If your vehicle failed the on-board diagnostic (OBDII) part of the inspection, it is likely that your vehicle’s engine and/or emissions control system needs repairs. Review your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) to understand the reasons for failure. Your inspection mechanic should be able to answer your questions.

AVIP Desk Mat

15 January 2019
Originally created for, and distributed, to official Vermont Inspection Stations. Includes information about the vehicle inspection process.

My vehicle did not pass inspection and it is the last day of the month. What next?

DMV recommends consumers do not wait until the last minute to get an inspection. Customers can take vehicles in for inspection up to two months before the inspection is due. Customers need to work with their mechanic/dealer to get vehicle repaired as soon as possible. Always carry the Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) in the vehicle, showing that you are working towards compliance.

Vehicle Readiness

OBD II technology monitors all components of the engine management system and can detect a malfunction or deterioration of these components usually well before the driver becomes aware of any problem. Vehicles equipped with OBD II self-test their emission systems while the vehicle is being driven. Vehicles perform up to 11 system tests, depending on year, make and model of the vehicle. Readiness status identifies whether the vehicle's computer has completed the required tests since the last time the vehicle was serviced with a scan tool or had its battery disconnected.

Emissions Warranty

Vermont law requires that a vehicle’s entire emissions control system be warranted for a minimum of 3 years or 50,000 miles. Warranty coverage for the more expensive emissions control components is extended to at least 7 years or 70,000 miles, and the engine computer and catalytic converter are covered for 8 years or 80,000 miles. Some vehicles’ emissions control systems are warranted up to 15 years or 150,000 miles! Knowing about your vehicle’s warranty could save you significant money, and can also help protect Vermont’s air quality!

How do I get my vehicle’s OBD system “ready”?

The vehicle should be driven under a variety of normal operating conditions in order for the OBD system to become ready. These operating conditions include a mix of highway driving and stop and go, city type driving, and at least one overnight-off period. Your vehicle owner’s manual should provide more specific information on getting your vehicle’s OBD system ready. For more information on readiness, please visit: http://dec.vermont.gov/ sites/dec/files/aqc/ mobile-sources/ documents/ Readiness.pdf

What if my vehicle’s OBD system is “not ready”?

If your vehicle’s OBD system is not ready, the inspection of the OBD system cannot be completed. While this does not necessarily mean that your vehicle has a problem, it does indicate that your vehicle’s OBD system has not yet completed it’s tests, and problems may be present, but not yet identified. A recently disconnected or discharged (run down) battery, or recent servicing using a scan tool are the most likely reasons for a vehicle’s OBD system being “not ready.” Note that there are a few vehicles which should not be rejected as “not ready”.

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Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles
120 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05603-0001

Monday-Friday: 7:45am-4:30pm
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