Vehicle Inspections

Inspection stations in Vermont are privately owned and operated by our business partners. Inspection stations and certified Inspection Mechanics are licensed by DMV to conduct inspections as prescribed in the Vermont Periodic Inspection Manual.

  • Vermont has required safety inspections on vehicles since 1935 and inspection procedures became Administrative Rules in the 1960s.
  • Emissions inspections have been required since 1997.
  • DMV currently licenses, regulates and manages approximately 1,600 inspection station licenses and the licenses of approximately 5,000 certified Inspection Mechanics.

About Our Partner

Parsons was contracted by the State of Vermont to provide services for the AVIP, including inspection equipment, maintenance and support, program administration and a Technical Support Hotline. Parsons has been designing, implementing, and managing vehicle inspection programs throughout North America for more than three decades. Currently, Parsons manages emissions and safety inspection programs in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Hawaii, Louisiana, and Ontario. Inspection stations electing to administer safety and emission testing will work together with the State and Parsons.

parsons.com/solutions/vehicle-inspection-compliance

Questions and Feedback

Please use our online contact form to ask questions about the AVIP program.

Inspection Stations and Mechanics

Find information on becoming a certified Inspection Station or Inspection Mechanic. Or, use our special contact form for inspection stations to ask a question.

FAQs

  1. The vehicle’s OBD system connector has been removed or is otherwise not working properly. The OBD check cannot be completed if the connector is missing or is not working properly. 
  2. The Malfunction Indicator Light does not illuminate at all when the ignition key is turned to the “on” position. When the vehicle’s OBD system detects a problem, it turns on the warning light to alert the driver to a problem. However, if the light cannot illuminate because the bulb has burned out or is otherwise not working, the driver would not be alerted to the problem. 
  3. The Malfunction Indicator Light on the instrument panel is on (and/or commanded on by the vehicle’s on board computer) while the engine is running. This indicates that the OBD system has identified a problem which must be repaired. In this case, one or more diagnostic trouble codes will also be reported by the vehicle’s OBD system and these codes will help your technician diagnose and repair your vehicle. 

If your vehicle failed, it must be repaired in order to receive a new inspection sticker. Your vehicle should be repaired by a qualified, trained automotive service technician equipped with the appropriate diagnostic and repair tools. Depending on your vehicle’s age and mileage, repairs may be covered by the vehicle manufacturer’s warranty. Refer to your vehicle owner’s manual for specific information on warranty coverage.

Motor vehicles are the largest source of toxic and ozone-forming air pollutants in Vermont. While modern vehicles are getting much cleaner due to newer engine management technology and emission control components, emissions stay low only when all these systems are working properly. OBD technology helps to ensure that vehicles are operating as designed, and the OBD check ensures that the vehicle’s OBD system is doing its job. 

OBD technology was developed in the 1980s by vehicle manufacturers to help technicians diagnose and service the computerized engine management systems of modern vehicles. A new generation of OBD (often referred to as OBD II) is present on 1996 and newer vehicles. OBD II monitors all components of the engine management system and can detect a malfunction or deterioration of these components usually well before the driver becomes aware of any problem. When a problem is detected, the OBD system turns on a warning light on the instrument panel to alert the driver of the need to have the vehicle checked by a service technician. 

A scan tool with generic OBD II capability is necessary to perform the required check. A scan tool is a very useful device which is commonly used to assist in the diagnosis and repair of a variety of vehicle problems. Many inspection stations already own scan tools which can also be used to perform the required OBD check, but those inspection stations which do not will need to have one in order to inspect 1996 and newer vehicles. At a minimum, scan tools must be capable of :

  1. automatic initialization with any vehicle,
  2. determining readiness status of OBD monitors,
  3. determining malfunction indicator light status, and
  4. retrieving diagnostic trouble codes.

Any scan tool which complies with Society of Automotive Engineers Recommended Practice J1978 is acceptable. Scan tools are available from a number of well known equipment manufacturers.

Contact Us

Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles
120 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05603-0001

Monday-Friday: 7:45am-4:30pm
email telephone

Public Records

Connect with us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Instagram icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon